Thai Venison Mini Meatballs

In the interest of total disclosure, my wife’s initial observation of these was, “those are some nice looking turds”; and for that reason a recipe without a picture (and you are not getting a thousand words either).  A picture would be super helpful but these are a dry, no sauce, meatball – but they are not short on flavor.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground venison (or not, I ground it in the course of this recipe)
  • 1 1/2 tbsp red curry paste
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce (or for something extra special some Bluegrass Soy Sauce)
  • a couple drops of fish sauce
  • 1 egg beaten
  • 1/4 c almond flour
  • 1 tbsp dried Thai basil
  • handful of fresh cilantro chopped
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Directions

  1. Preheat the over to 400°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Mix together all ingredients except the almond flour, if using unground meat chop meat into 1″ cubes and thoroughly mix them with the other ingredients, grind all twice through a fine plate.
  3. Add in almond flour and mix thoroughly.
  4. Using your hands, form into 1 ounce meat balls and placed on the previously lined baking sheet.
  5. Bake for 10 minutes and then turn the broiler on high for a minute or so to brown the meatballs.
  6. Serve hot.

Just another in a list of venison recipes, but something different.  If these are not spicy enough (they are not spicy) serve them with some Sriracha.

Posted in Recipes, What's for dinner Tagged with: , , , ,

Wild Turkey Buffalo Ranch Meatballs

Picture this, you have just breasted out your spring tom and you are ready to throw out that carcass, but wait!  Not so fast, grab the rest of the meat on the carcass, sure the drumsticks might better suited for chicken feed but those other bits, grab those and hang onto them for your next big game tailgate.

These are simple, don’t grind those bits right away, save them until you are ready to make these.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb wild turkey (or ground turkey from the dreaded store)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp parsley
  • 1 clove garlic (pressed)
  • 1 egg beaten
  • 2 tbsp Frank’s Red Hot Wing Sauce (or your favorite), plus extra for coating
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 tsp onion powder
  • 1/4 tsp dill weed
  • 1/8 tsp thyme leaves
  • 1/4 c almond flower

Directions

  1. Preheat the over to 400°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. If you working with previously ground meat, obviously you will not need to grind the meats, just skip the grinding.  Combine all ingredients but the almond flower and mix thoroughly, if using unground meat – grind it through a fine plate twice.
  3. Once the ground meat is combined thoroughly mix in the almond flour.
  4. Using your hands form ~1 ounce meatballs placing them on the previously lined baking sheet.
  5. Bake for 10 minutes and then turn the broiler on high for a minute or so until the meatballs brown up.
  6. Toss with additional wing sauce to coat and serve hot

And there you have it, stop throwing away all that goodness and enjoy.

Posted in Recipes, What's for dinner Tagged with: , , , , ,

Gloves

In a bit of a deviation I need to rant!

I own a lot of gloves – I have gloves for hunting, gloves for cleaning a deer, gloves for butchering a deer, gloves for keeping my hands warm when its cold and gloves for keeping my hands warm when its even colder; I have gloves for keeping my hands warm when driving when its cold and for protecting my hands from splinters when I handle firewood; I have gloves that help me grip tools when working on the car, gloves to handle things that are hot and even gloves to keep my hands dry and warm when swimming in really cold weather.  Some of those gloves even work with my smartphone.  I have a lot of gloves that protect my desk hands and keep them comfortable throughout a whole range of tasks.  More importantly I have the right gloves for the job and don’t expect more out of my gloves than I am willing to put into them.  My deer gutting gloves for instances are disposable and thrown away after each use.

Which leads me to  a conversation I had last week, about gloves and the cold.  An individual I was talking about was lamenting how cold their hands got when they ran in spite of wearing gloves, it was about 10°F that day with a brisk wind and they were wearing the gloves you see below (and can buy on Amazon if you hate your hands).

So what is the point of this rant?  As someone who routinely manages expectations of all sorts, I have observed that most people have unrealistic expectations about something whether it is a project, their job or their marriage – and that specific unrealistic expectation has to do with them, they are not willing to put in any more than the most minimal amount of effort and expect everything in return.  In a project the less planning you are willing to do the farther the end result will fall short of your expectations.  In a job, giving the minimum will return the minimum if that.

So what are you doing to align your effort with your expectations, don’t expect a cheap pair of knit gloves to keep your hands warm in driving bitter cold and don’t expect the bare minimum effort to get you anything but the bare minimum result.

Posted in Blogroll Tagged with: , , ,

Venison Pastrami

In spite of the ridiculously warm hunts the deer have been on their feet this year and I am grateful to have taken a couple.  The farm I have been hunting has a deer problem, it is not uncommon to see twenty or more deer a sit, which makes every sit exciting.  Ten days ago I had what appeared to be a wounded deer come in that was obviously in rough shape and so I took the shot and killed it instantly, if you don’t believe me I will send you a picture of the shot.  Regardless upon butchering I discovered that the reason it appeared to be injured is that it was injured, one front shoulder was completely dislocated and the other a bruised ball of mess.  Fear not the chickens loved those two shoulders.  I butchered the rest of the deer you would as any other and set aside two roasts to make…pastrami.  I love pastrami, I love corned beef/venison as well but have a special place in my heart for pastrami.

20161025_201349

I have made pastrami in the passed and it was always just not quite right, either dry or funky or something, well this time I nailed it.  It is fantastic, had some last night on pumpernickel with horseradish cheddar and mayo, might have another for lunch.

As with other cured meats the process is as important as the ingredients and in this case more so for flavor, with here is what I ended up with.
20161017_101212

Ingredients (cure)

  • 3-5 pounds venison
  • 1/4 c tender quick (do not skip, this is the cure part)
  • 2 tbsp dark brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp onion powder
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cloves
  • 1/4 tsp ground mustard
  • coupe bay leaves crumbled

Ingredients (rub)

  • 3 tbsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp garlic powder

Instructions

  1. Trim, wash and dry meat.  Set aside.
  2. Combine cure ingredients thoroughly and rub liberally all over meat.
  3. Place meat in a gallon zip lock bag or better yet vacuum seal it and place it in the fridge for at least five days, depending on meat thickness.  I went seven for this batch and it was perfect.  Turn the bag/pouch everyday.
  4. After the meat has cured – remove it from the bag, rinse and place the meat in a bowl of clean water to soak.  It should soak for at least a couple hours bur preferably over night or better yet while you are at the office.
  5. After soaking, remove meat from the water, rinse again.  Pat dry.
  6. Combine ingredients for rub, rub liberally all over the meat.  Allow meat to sit out.
  7. Preheat smoker to 225°F, add wood for smoker once preheated (I used a chunk of oak and a chunk of hickory)
  8. Once the smoker has been preheated, place the meat on the smoker and smoke until the center of the meat is 150°F
  9. Once the meat is up to 150°F in the center, remove from the smoker, wrap tightly in foil with a splash of water, beer, stock, etc.  Wrap this foil packet in a towel or two and let it sit on the counter for a half hour, this is super important to having an awesome end product.
  10. After a half an hour slice and enjoy.  It will be better the next day.

And that is it, pastrami, at home with an animal hopefully sourced by yourself, that is knowing where your food comes from.  And if anyone knows where I can find a wild pig running around in Michigan I can know where my bacon comes from too.

What is your favorite way to enjoy venison?

Posted in Recipes, Smoked Goodness, What's for dinner Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

A quick early fall update

20160905_195001

 

We have made it through yet another year on the ‘farm’, which sounds better than ‘small scale agriculture experiment’.  We have a cellar full of food for the winter and are looking for to the meat store opening, which to the rest of the world is known as hunting season.  No doubt the coming weeks will outline some of the projects we have undertaken this summer and ones we are looking forward but for now, a list:

  • Our chickens survived another year and continue to lay
  • We have a FULL cellar – and our garlic is fantastic
  • We planted 6 new fruit trees this spring as well as blueberries, black raspberries and strawberries (both June and Everbearing)
  • We got watermelons – first time we have managed to ripen them
  • We grew ARTICHOKES and harvested them
  • We have been working on the house and after many long hours have restored our original pine floors in both the living room and bed room downstairs
  • We installed our first permanent raised beds for the fruit listed above as well as herbs for culinary and medicinal use

Aside from all of that I am sure I will think of more – check back in the coming weeks for some more in depth follow ups.

Posted in Blogroll, Chickens, Gardening, Preserving the Harvest Tagged with: